Planning Wedding Timeline

Dear Brides & Photographer Friends,

This blog post is for both of you ❤ ❤

Lets chat about Wedding Timeline because it is not one of the mostttttttttt, but THE MOST important thing when planning a wedding (for brides) and setting expectations of the clients & getting things done (for photographers).

those who Fail to Plan,
Plan to Fail!

That’s exactly why I love talking to each bride and discuss their wedding timeline way in advance. This gives me insight of their plans, how the wedding day will unfold, & helps me not to miss any details.

While discussing the timeline, I always ask all the vendors’ names for credits, give tips and insights of the wedding to my brides and answer any questions/concerns they might have. I also make sure to let them know how much time I need for specific section of the photoshoot and to keep some grace time for prayers, late makeup artist, hairstylist, mishaps, etc.

Planning-wedding-timeline

Following are some of the questions I always ask my brides and write them down.

  1. Is the bride getting ready at a salon, the venue, bridal room, or hotel suite?
    • helps me determine travel time to/from the ballroom.
  2. Who is the makeup artist, makeup start & finish time.
    • Is the makeup artist doing makeup on family members or only the bride? This can make/break the entire timeline.
  3. Who is the hairstylist, hair start & finish time.
  4. Is the groom coming for the photoshoot before or after the ceremony?
    • Brides, feel free to read my recommendation about first look – it is super useful, promise!
  5. Ballroom/kosha ready time.
  6. Expected number of guests. Expected arrival time.
    • helps me plan how much time I have for the ballroom decorations’ photos.
  7. Bride’s entrance time.
    • helps me know time for bride-groom’s photoshoot from her prep until her entrance.
  8. Any entertainment, singers, performers, Zaffa, belly-dancers, violinist, etc.
    • anything the couple spend time/effort/money on must be documented.
  9. Groom’s entrance time.
    • I also ask if the groom is coming in alone or with family/friends. Helps me choose the right lens in advance 😉
  10. Cake cutting & drink exchange times.
  11. Family photos time.
  12. Expected exit time.

I hope this post helps you plan the wedding day even better. If you have ANY questions, please feel free to leave them in the comments below and I’d be moreeeeee than happy to answer them.

Love,
Your UnOfficial Bridesmaid & PF (photographer friend) 😉
~ Rima

Advertisements

How to Take Natural Photos

When I started wedding photography, the thing that I was most scared of was posing the bride & groom. It took me quite sometime to understand things that can make/break the couple’s connection in the photos.

Although I can do several posts on this topic covering different topics on posing, the following are things to consider when posing bride & groom on the wedding day and aiming for natural photos.

  1. Give your clients time to relax. Strike a conversation by congratulating them. Give them reasons to smile instead of asking them to ‘smile’ or ‘act natural’.
  2. Explain what’s in store. Clients love this. Tell them how the photoshoot will go by, how much time you need, and what you expect out of the shoot.
  3. Compliment!!! It assures the couple that they look great and are doing everything right. Compliments are great way to boost confidence and to relax them.
  4. Be VERY careful with your WORDS! Couples tend to be extra emotional on the day of the wedding. Say things that will make you laugh with them, not at them.
  5. Give Specific Instructions. Instead of placing their hands where you want it to be, make the couple slide into the pose. “Chin slightly down. Eyes up. Beautiful. Soften the eyes. Show me that ‘I’m sexy & I know it’ smile!” BOOM! There is your gorgeous photo.
  6. Avoid Awkward Silences. I happen to talk from behind my camera while photographing. All-The-Time! Talking/complimenting while clicking through the bride’s preparations and/or couple’s laughter, produces best natural photos.
  7. Actions instead of Mannequins. Tell them to walk, talk, or share a joke. A simple statement as “look how beautiful she looks!” can result in amazing smiles and gestures.

Hamlet_Golf_New_York_Wedding_Female_Dubai_Photographer_Rima_Hassan_0036

I hope this post helps you lead your next photoshoot like a Boss! Don’t hesitate to ask if you have any questions regarding wedding photography and I’ll be more than happy to share what I know.

Follow me on Instagram & check my Insta-Stories for some quick tips & tricks, DOs & DON’Ts, and lots of behind the scenes from actual weddings ❤

How to Take Sharp Photos

Once I heard, “if you learn late, pass on the knowledge to someone else early.”  When I received her message, I answered her questions and then asked her if I can share both (her message and the answers) publicly so someone else might benefit from it too.

“Hey Rima!! I saw your Instagram feed and I am so inspired by your detail shots! They are so beautiful! How do you get your lighting in such difficult venues so perfect? Every single one! So consistent and glossy. Just beautiful. I have major goals this summer inspired by your sharp images. Totally in love.”

Even if it helps ONE person, I’d feel that this post served its purpose. I’m not a guru but I tried my best to answer with all that I know. Here is my answer to her…

How to Take Sharp Photos.jpg

  1. Know what your equipment can do.
    • I upgraded to Canon 5D Mark IV. It is a 30.4 Megapixel full frame camera (5D Mark III is 22.3 Megapixels in case you wonder). It is ahhhhhmazingly SHARP!
  2. Macro Lens.
    • Get close to the main subject, use shorter focal length and lens. For all my detail photos (as well as few of bride’s portraits), I use Canon’s 100mm f/2.8 macro lens. The macro lens is specifically used for tiny-details and its latest results can be seen here.
  3. High Aperture.
    • I use a flash or soft-box with very high aperture for jewelry shots. Most of the jewelry, bouquet, shoes, and/or dress photos I take are between f/4 – f/11. The high aperture will produce great results regardless of the lens.
  4. Use Flash.
    • For ballroom photos, I use On-Camera Flash (600 EX II-RT) but on MANUAL to keep the colors consistent. You might need a battery pack for speedlites because manual mode uses too much battery power.
  5. External Lights.
    • I also use external lights in the ballroom (for details only – not for the family/bride/groom photos in the ballroom). It provides extra lighting and separates the main subject from the background so it pops out in the photos. High aperture makes it easy to edit and the photos end up crisp sharp regardless of the dark venues.
  6. Light Angles.
    • Use flashes/soft-box at different angles so the details, especially diamond jewelry, doesn’t get too many highlights. Place the external source of light on the sides, on top, or behind the main subject to produce exotic photos.

I hope my answer help you create beautiful sharp photos. Feel free to share your own tips/tricks in the comments. Don’t hesitate to ask if you have any questions related to photography. I will try my best to answer. Promise! 🙂